Curriculum Expectations in Writing

Year 1   Year 2   Year 3   Year 4   Year 5   Year 6

Year 1 Writing

Year 1 Expectations

Transcription

  • Sit correctly at a table, holding a pencil comfortably and correctly.
  • Begin to form lower case letters in the correct direction, starting and finishing in the right place
  • Form capital letters and the digits 0-9
  • Understand which letters belong to which handwriting ‘families’ (i.e. letters that are formed in similar ways) and to practise these
  • Identify known phonemes in unfamiliar words
  • Use syllables to divide words when spelling
  • Use knowledge of alternative phonemes to narrow down possibilities for accurate spelling
  • Use the spelling rule for adding s or es for verbs in 3rd person singular
  • Name the letters of the alphabet in order
  • Use letter names to show alternative spellings of the same phoneme

Composition

  • Compose a sentence orally before writing it
  • Sequence sentences to form short narratives
  • Sequence sentences in chronological order to recount an event or an experience
  • Re-read what they have written to check that it makes sense
  • Leave spaces between words
  • Begin to punctuate sentences using a capital letter, and a full stop, question mark or exclamation mark
  • Use a capital letter for names of people, places, the days of the week, and the personal pronoun ‘I’
  • Use ‘and’ to join sentences together
  • Know how the prefix ‘un’ can be added to words to change meaning
  • Use the suffixes: s, es, ed, er and ing within their writing

Writing-Exceeding Statements

  • Write short stories about something personal to them
  • Sequence a short story or series of events related to learning in science, history & geography
  • Writing makes sense to the reader without additional explanation
  • Confident in changing the way sentences start
  • Make sentences longer and use words other than ‘and’ and ‘then’ to join ideas together
  • Use new vocabulary for the first time in story or explanations and is excited about experimenting with new vocabulary
  • Know which letters sit below the line and which are tall letters
  • Consistent in use of lower case and capital letters
  • Sound out spelling when not sure and come up with phonetically plausible attempts at spelling unfamiliar words
  • Spell almost all words in the Year 1 and 2 list accurately.

Year 2 Writing

Expectations

Transcription

  • Segment spoken words into phonemes and record these as graphemes
  • Spell words with different alternative spellings, including a few common homophones
  • Spell longer words using suffixes such as ment, ness, ful, less, ly
  • Use knowledge of alternative phonemes to narrow down possibilities for accurate spelling
  • Identify known phonemes in unfamiliar words and use syllables to divide words
  • Form lower case letters of the correct size relative to one another
  • Begin to use some of the diagonal and horizontal strokes needed to join letters
  • Understand which letters, when adjacent to one another, are best left unjoined
  • Write capital letters and digits of the correct size, with correct orientation and relationship to one another and to lower case letters
  • Use spacing between words that reflects the size of the letters

Composition

  • Write narratives about personal experiences and those of others (real and fictional)
  • Write for different purposes, including real events
  • Plan and discuss the content of writing and write down ideas
  • Orally rehearse structured sentences or sequences of sentences
  • Evaluate writing independently, with peers and with teacher
  • Proof-read to check for errors in spelling, grammar and punctuation
  • Use full stops, capital letters, exclamation and question marks accurately to demarcate sentences and commas for lists
  • Use a capital letter for names of people, places, the days of the week, and the personal pronoun ‘I
  • Use subordination (using when, if, that, or because) and co-ordination (using or, and, or but)
  • Use present and past tenses correctly and consistently including the progressive form

Mastery

Exceeding Statements

  • Descriptions are clear enough for people to recognise what is meant even when things are not named
  • Use some phrases and words that they come across in reading
  • Use words like ‘suddenly’ or ‘amazingly’, so that writing grips the reader’s interest
  • Stories have interesting endings that have been carefully thought about
  • Consistent in using the first or third person
  • Keep writing interesting throughout and not be tempted to look at quick ways to finish it
  • Check that capital letters, commas and question marks are used when needed and attempt to use speech marks
  • Use a dictionary to check spellings of words
  • Use specific nouns when needed, e.g. ‘terrier’ instead of ‘dog’
  • Take time to describe characters and events within stories, rather than move from one event to another

Year 3 Writing

Assessing Writing – Year 3 Expectations

Transcription

  • Spell words with additional prefixes and suffixes and understand how to add them to root words, for example – form nouns using super, anti, auto
  • Recognise and spell additional homophones, for example – he’ll, heel, heal
  • Use the first two or three letters of a word to check its spelling in a dictionary
  • Spell correctly word families based on common words, for example – solve, solution, solver
  • Spell identified commonly misspelt words from Year 3 and 4 word list
  • Make analogies from a word already known to apply to an unfamiliar word
  • Identify the root in longer words
  • Use the diagonal and horizontal strokes that are needed to join letters
  • Understand which letters, when adjacent to one another, are best left unjoined
  • Increase the legibility, consistency and quality of handwriting

Composition

  • Look at and discuss models of writing of the text type, purpose and audience to be written, noting: structure; grammatical features and use of vocabulary
  • Compose sentences using a wider range of structures linked to the grammar objectives
  • Write a narrative with a clear structure, setting, characters and plot
  • Write a non-narrative using simple organisational devices such as headings and sub-headings
  • Suggest improvement to writing through assessing writing with peers and self-assessment
  • Make improvements by proposing changes to grammar and vocabulary to improve consistency, e.g. the accurate use of pronouns in sentences
  • Use a range of sentences with more than one clause by using a wider range of conjunctions, e.g. when, if, because, although
  • Use the perfect form of verbs to mark relationships of time and cause
  • Use conjunctions, adverbs and prepositions to express time and cause
  • Proof-read to check for errors in spelling and punctuation errors

Assessing Writing – Year 3 Mastery

Writing-Exceeding Statements

  • Use adjectives and adverbs with confidence, and attempt to think of different ones to use in different situations
  • Give careful thought to the planning of writing and re-read it as a matter of course
  • Ensure that descriptions have just enough detail to help the reader gain a better understanding about the way the story is unfolding
  • Use words that have not been used before when describing events, characters and feelings
  • Use powerful verbs to show character or add impact
  • Vary sentences, adding phrases to make the meaning more precise
  • Include descriptions of events and characters in a variety of styles and can sometimes contain humour
  • Describe characters and include feelings and emotions when needed
  • Choose the most appropriate style of writing to suit the needs of the situations, e.g: poems, lists, letters, reports
  • Check punctuation and use speech marks and apostrophes accurately

Year 4 Writing

Assessing Writing – Year 4 Expectations

Transcription

  • Spell words with additional prefixes and suffixes and understand how to add them to root words, for example – form nouns using super, anti, auto
  • Recognise and spell additional homophones, for example – he’ll, heel, heal
  • Use the first two or three letters of a word to check its spelling in a dictionary
  • Spell correctly word families based on common words, for example – solve, solution, solver
  • Spell identified commonly misspelt words from Year 3 and 4 word list
  • Make analogies from a word already known to apply to an unfamiliar word
  • Identify the root in longer words
  • Use the diagonal and horizontal strokes that are needed to join letters
  • Understand which letters, when adjacent to one another, are best left unjoined
  • Increase the legibility, consistency and quality of handwriting

Composition

  • Look at and discuss models of writing of the text type, purpose and audience to be written, noting: structure; grammatical features and use of vocabulary
  • Compose sentences using a wider range of structures linked to the grammar objectives
  • Write a narrative with a clear structure, setting, characters and plot
  • Write a non-narrative using simple organisational devices such as headings and sub-headings
  • Suggest improvement to writing through assessing writing with peers and self-assessment
  • Make improvements by proposing changes to grammar and vocabulary to improve consistency, e.g. the accurate use of pronouns in sentences
  • Use a range of sentences with more than one clause by using a wider range of conjunctions, e.g. when, if, because, although
  • Use the perfect form of verbs to mark relationships of time and cause
  • Use conjunctions, adverbs and prepositions to express time and cause
  • Proof-read to check for errors in spelling and punctuation errors

Assessing Writing – Year 4 Mastery

Writing-Exceeding Statements

  • Use adjectives and adverbs with confidence, and attempt to think of different ones to use in different situations
  • Give careful thought to the planning of writing and re-read it as a matter of course
  • Ensure that descriptions have just enough detail to help the reader gain a better understanding about the way the story is unfolding
  • Use words that have not been used before when describing events, characters and feelings
  • Use powerful verbs to show character or add impact
  • Vary sentences, adding phrases to make the meaning more precise
  • Include descriptions of events and characters in a variety of styles and can sometimes contain humour
  • Describe characters and include feelings and emotions when needed
  • Choose the most appropriate style of writing to suit the needs of the situations, e.g: poems, lists, letters, reports
  • Check punctuation and use speech marks and apostrophes accurately

Year 5 Writing

Assessing Writing – Year 5 Expectations

Transcription

  • Form verbs with prefixes. for example, dis, de, mis, over and re.
  • Convert nouns or adjectives into verbs by adding a suffix, for example, ate, ise, ify.
  • Understand the general rules for adding prefixes and suffixes above.
  • Spell some words with ‘silent’ letters, e.g. knight, psalm, solemn.
  • Distinguish between homophones and other words which are often confused.
  • Spell identified commonly misspelt words from Year 5 and 6 word list.
  • Use the first three or four letters of a word to check spelling, meaning or both of these in a dictionary.
  • Use a thesaurus.
  • Use a range of spelling strategies.
  • Choose which shape of a letter to use when given choices and deciding, as part of their personal style, whether or not to join specific letters.
  • Choose the writing implement that is best suited for a task, (e.g. quick notes, letters).

Composition

  • Know the audience for and purpose of the writing.
  • Use the features and structures of text types taught so far.
  • Use grammatical features and vocabulary appropriate for the text types taught so far.
  • Start sentences in different ways.
  • Use sentence starters to highlight the main idea.
  • Develop characters through action and dialogue.
  • Establish viewpoint as the writer through commenting on characters or events.
  • Show how grammar and vocabulary choices create impact on the reader.
  • Choose vocabulary to engage and impact on the reader.

Assessing Writing – Year 5 Mastery

Writing-Exceeding Statements

  • Use paragraphs to structure the plot in narrative writing, showing changes in time, place and events.
  • Use changes in time and place to guide the reader through the text.
  • Use paragraphs to organise information logically and shape a non-fiction text effectively.
  • Sustain and develop ideas within a paragraph, introducing it with a topic sentence.
  • Close text with reference to its opening.
  • Re-order sentences to create impact on the reader.
  • Use expanded noun phrases to add well thought out detail to writing.
  • Use punctuation to clarify meaning of sentences – commas to mark phrases and clauses.
  • Use dialoguYear 6 WritingAssessing Writing – Year 6 ExpectationsTranscription
    • Convert verbs into nouns by adding suffixes, for example, tion, ure.
    • Distinguish between homophones and other words which are often confused.
    • Spell identified commonly misspelt words from Year 5 and 6 word list.
    • Understand that the spelling of some words needs to be learnt specifically.
    • Use dictionaries to check the spelling and meaning of words.
    • Use the first three or four letters of a word to check spelling, meaning or both of these in a dictionary.
    • Use a thesaurus.
    • Use a range of spelling strategies.
    • Choose which shape of a letter to use when given choices and deciding, as part of their personal style, whether or not to join specific letters.
    • Choose the writing implement that is best suited for a task (eg, quick notes, letters).

    Composition

    • Identify the audience for and purpose of the writing.
    • Choose the appropriate form, and register for the audience and purpose of the writing.
    • Use grammatical structures/features and choose vocabulary appropriate to the audience, purpose and degree of formality to make meaning clear and create effect.
    • Use a range of sentence starters to create specific effects, for example, adverbials, conjunctions, ing, ed.
    • Use developed noun phrases to add detail to sentences.
    • Use the passive voice to present information with a different emphasis.
    • Use commas to mark phrases and clauses.
    • Sustain and develop main ideas logically in narrative and non-narrative writing.
    • Use character, dialogue and action to advance events in narrative writing.
    • Summarise text, conveying key information.

    Assessing Writing – Year 6 Mastery

    Writing-Exceeding Statements

    • Choose the appropriate style and form for the purpose and audience of the writing.
    • Use techniques to engage the reader, for example, personal comments, opening hook, flashback.
    • Write paragraphs with a clear focus.
    • Write paragraphs with different structures and lengths.
    • Link ideas within and between paragraphs with a range of cohesive devices, for example, connecting adverbs/adverbials, use of pronouns.
    • Use different sentence structures and length to suit the purpose and audience of the writing.
    • Use a range of sentence types for impact and specific effect on the reader.
    • Control complex sentences, manipulating the clauses to achieve specific effects.
    • Use punctuation to convey and clarify meaning, including colon and semi-colon.
    • Make precise and specific word choices according to the text type and audience.
    • Summarise longer texts precisely, identifying the key information.
    • Use the passive voice confidently, for example, to create suspense or in a science investigation or historical or geographical report.
    • Use the subjunctive in the most formal writing to express a wish or a suggestion for the future.

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